Your voice matters

The CEA Staff Survey will close on Sunday, Feb. 7, at 11:59 p.m. Your Association urges all members to complete the online survey, so everyone will have an accurate picture of the professional climate in every building.

Members have been sent multiple emails with a survey link to their non-CCS email address since Friday, Jan. 22.

If you or your colleagues did not receive the email in your inbox or the junk/spam folder, please send an email from your non-CCS email account to tellcea@ceaohio.org with your first and last name and your work location.

 

Obama proposes $4 billion for computer science ed

In his weekly radio address, President Obama introduced his plan for a $4 billion program to increase computer science education in American schools. Obama and White House officials said today’s students must develop the skill to compete in an evolving economy and allow the US to continue to lead the world.

The Washington Post reported that if Congress approves, the funds “would be doled out over a period of three years to any state that applies for the funds and has a well-designed plan to expand access to computer science courses, especially for girls and minorities.” The White House is also asking for another $100 million for a “competitive grant program for school districts with ambitious plans to reach more students, especially those who have been underrepresented in computer science classes.”

Detroit’s teachers take it to court

The Detroit Federation of Teachers filed a lawsuit in Michigan state court against the city school system over what they claim are unsafe conditions. CBS News showed union president Ivy Bailey saying, “Educators have been snubbed, ignored, disrespected, and punished when they informed the school district of specific safety and health problems.” The lawsuit calls for repairs to schools and the firing of Darnell Earley, the governor-appointed schools emergency manager. The Washington Post reported that the lawsuit focuses on “terrible” conditions at Detroit schools, “including missing ceiling tiles, buckled floors, exposed wires and mold, as well as infestations of roaches and rats.” The lawsuit claims the facilities violate students’ constitutional right to a “minimally adequate education.”