OTES changes now in effect

Your recent issue of the CEA Voice detailed the changes to the Ohio Teacher Evaluation System (OTES) that begin this year. We want to remind you of their importance.

The process of calculating and including value-added ratings for inclusion in the evaluation process is NEW. This year, ALL teachers must do two Student Learning Objectives (SLOs) at the beginning of the school year.

The Ohio Department of Education has also clarified that any employee who works with students 50 percent or more of the work day must be evaluated using OTES. That means that now, all tutors and part-time hourly teachers will be included in the teacher evaluation process.

Pertinent details of the CCS-adopted format for this school year include:

Half of the teacher rating is based on summative evaluation of performance, while the entire rating for Licensed Support Professionals (LSPs) will be based on performance.

  • Teachers will develop student growth measures for half of their rating. They will have either professional growth or improvement plans, which they will discuss with administrators at their scheduled conferences. Conferences should be held by Sept. 30, 2015.
  • Teachers will need to submit two (2) student learning objectives (SLOs) to the student learning objectives portal by Oct. 16, 2015, for approval by building assessment leaders.

Evaluations are at these intervals, depending on your rating:

See www.ccsoh.us/Downloads/2015-16_FULL_revised_August_2015.pdf.

Teachers new to CCS will be evaluated by their PAR Consulting Teachers. Teachers who have moved from an LSP position to a teaching position, or vice versa, will move through the full annual evaluation cycle in their new capacities.

The CCS ILEAD Portal will have up-to-date information regarding the CCS teacher evaluation process. If you have specific questions, contact Teri Mullins, CEA (253-4731) or Greg Mild, Office of Learning and Licensure (365-5039).

Seattle teachers on strike

After failed negotiations, Seattle teachers formed a picket line today. The first day of school has been canceled for all of the district’s 53,000 students. The National Education Association shared that teachers are also going on strike in southeast Washington in Pasco while the state legislature struggles to increase funding for education due to a state supreme court order that sanctions the state $100,000 every day that the lawmakers failed to “adequately pay to educate the state’s 1 million school children.”

The Seattle School Board has voted to take legal action against the striking teachers. The strike in Seattle is the first in 30 years. Read more here.

Register for regular NEA education updates here.

Step up the oversight

Fun facts for our new school year:

  • Classrooms are busy.
  • School buses are back on the road.
  • Ohio legislators still have not enacted tougher charter school regulations.

OEA Vice President Scott DiMauro spoke publicly about this issue just as we were getting ready to welcome our students. House Bill 2 was tabled just before summer recess.  The bill includes widespread reform for charter schools. It holds sponsors accountable for the schools’ successes and failures. It requires sponsors to monitor each school’s progress and provide technical assistance, including ensuring each has a plan to improve performance. Some legislators and officials want more fiscal transparency as well and some have called for key accounting changes to make it easier to monitor how the schools’ tax dollars are spent.

DiMauro said: “We’re troubled that the opportunity was lost to start a new school year with an improved system, and hope that members of the House will act swiftly to pass the Senate bill and resist pressure from some who profit from the current system to water down the legislation. Given the scandal around the Ohio Department of Education’s failure to enact charter sponsor ratings in a clean and lawful way, the urgency for action is greater than ever.”