Speak Out: Waiting for "Superman"

Phone Booth, February 2008 by Flickr user Maggie Osterberg.

The documentary film, Waiting for “Superman,” by producer Davis Guggenheim is scheduled to open in Columbus on Friday, Oct. 14. A film that evokes strong emotions, it tells the story of injustice in America’s education system. It says important things about the challenges of the public education system. However, the reductive messaging—“charters are good” and “teachers unions are bad”—oversimplifies complicated issues and threatens to thwart thoughtful discussions about improving public schools.

You will be tempted to get defensive about this film. But CEA welcomes and encourages filmgoers to join us in our mission of making great public schools for every student. Association members have always led the fight for great public schools, and we hope the movie inspires others to become engaged in a larger discussion about the shared responsibility for public education.

The CEA Blog wants to know:

What are your thoughts about  Waiting For “Superman”? Do you think this film will create a constructive or divisive dialogue about improving public education? Feel free to write a review if you have already seen the film!

Visitors to the CEA Blog do not need to be registered to leave a reply. Simply click on the “Comments” link directly below the post title. Type in a screen name of your choice, enter your email address and leave your comment. Please make sure your comment adheres to our posting guidelines. Once your comment has been moderated, it will be visible to all visitors to the CEA Blog.

Speak Out: Teachers trapped, troubled by district technology

"And you throught your had computer problems" by Flickr user mandyxclear

As education professionals in the 21st century, we rely more on computer-based technology to help us improve teaching and learning for our students that ever before. Unfortunately, CEA members throughout CCS experience the first-hand effects of unwieldy, unresponsive district technology on a daily basis. 

Often times, our district’s technology causes more problems in our classrooms than it is intended to solve. CEA understands you are experiencing technical difficulties in your building as well as at home trying to incorporate district-managed hardware, software and data systems into your educational practice.

The CEA Blog wants to know:

What are some examples of how district technology is currently negatively impacting or affecting your ability to do your job at your workplace or at home?

Visitors to the CEA Blog do not need to be registered to leave a reply. Simply click on the “Comments” link directly below the post title. Type in a screen name of your choice, enter your email address and leave your comment. Please make sure your comment adheres to our posting guidelines. Once your comment has been moderated, it will be visible to all visitors to the CEA Blog.


(polls)

84 percent of laid-off CEA members have been given recall notices

On Friday, Aug. 13, the administration of the Columbus City Schools confirmed to CEA President Rhonda Johnson that 96 of 113 CEA members that had been given layoff notices in late April have since been issued recall notices. Below is the article that ran in The CEA Voice regarding the layoffs.

On Friday, Apr. 23, the administration gave layoff notices to 113 teachers. Based on the staff allocations for next school year, there are more teachers than there are positions. Additionally, the administration projects a loss of 2,500 students for the 2010-2011 school year.

The areas of certification/licensure that are affected include: Visual Arts, English, Integrated Language/Arts, Spanish, Physical Education, Health, Music, Middle Childhood Education, Elementary (K-8 and 1-8), Early Childhood, Kindergarten–Primary, Life Sciences, Entertainment Marketing, Industrial Technology, Electronics and Job Training–Food Management Production.

Based on experience, past practice and history, CEA believes that too many teachers have been laid off for the following reasons:

* The loss of students has been steadily declining, with approximately 800 having left this school year.

* Human Resources hired more than 300 new teachers for this school year.

* More than 100 teachers have given notice that they intend to resign or retire at the end of this school year.

* Each year, about 50 teachers resign over the summer.

* Typically, the district hires no fewer than 100 new teachers each year.

* In past layoffs, teachers were recalled before the next school year started.

We hope that the district is not unnecessarily disrupting teachers’ lives and paying unemployment benefits over the summer, only to recall laid-off teachers when school starts.