The twelve days of testing

On the first day of testing,
my students gave to me
an unfinished TRC.

On the second day of testing,
my students gave to me
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the third day of testing,
my students gave to me
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the fourth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the fifth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

 

 

 

On the sixth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the seventh day of testing,
my students gave to me
Seven long staff meetings,
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the eighth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Eight encore classes,
Seven long staff meetings,
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

 

 

 

On the ninth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Nine urgent emails,
Eight encore classes,
Seven long staff meetings,
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the tenth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Ten brand new students,
Nine urgent emails,
Eight encore classes,
Seven long staff meetings,
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

 

 

 

 

 

On the eleventh day of testing,
my students gave to me
Eleven shortened specials,
Ten brand new students,
Nine urgent emails,
Eight encore classes,
Seven long staff meetings,
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the twelfth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Twelve long sleepless nights,
Eleven shortened specials,
Ten brand new students,
Nine urgent emails,
Eight encore classes,
Seven long staff meetings,
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC!

NEA grant to CEA expands Peer Assistance and Review program

Peer Assistance and Review (PAR), one of CEA’s most successful programs, is now expanding. The program will now serve second-year teachers in the Briggs and Linden-McKinley feeder patterns. PAR II will be facilitated by a PAR Consulting Teacher and the building principal.

Support for PAR II is being provided by CEA’s $1.25 million grant from the NEA Foundation. One of CEAs goals is to strengthen teacher preparation and build a stronger web of collaborative support.

PAR will provide two full years of mentoring, assistance and review for these teachers. The extended PAR program will focus on:

* Professional self-reflection assessment
* Identifying four goals for the year
* Building and maintaining a professional portfolio to track progress and goal completion

PAR is a national model. For more than 20 years, the district and the Association have worked together to sponsor and mentor new teachers and those who find later that they need assistance. PAR ensures that there is a high quality teacher in every classroom.

Closing the Achievement Gap Grant: Grade 7

(Note: This is the second in a series of three posts that highlight the achievement gap that will be addressed by a recent NEA Foundation grant award.)

Recently, CEA President Rhonda Johnson announced that the Association along with the district has received a $1.25 million, five-year grant from the NEA Foundation. CEA and CCS were one of only three district/union partnerships out of the NEA’s 14,000 local unions to receive these funds.

The NEA Foundation Closing the Achievement Gap award will help us transform some of our most challenged schools into local and national models for teaching and learning. The grant’s resources will be focused on the schools feeding to Briggs and Linden-McKinley high schools.

Through the utilization of Google Motion Chart technology, the CEA Blog has transformed test scores from the Ohio Department of Education into a series of revealing animations. They depict the achievement gap in middle schools within the feeder patterns for Linden-McKinley and Briggs high schools.

These animations show the percentage of students in each school scoring proficient or above on the seventh grade reading and math Ohio Achievement Assessments over the past five years. Users can compare school results to CCS, Franklin County and the state of Ohio. Groups are disaggregated by race and economic status when possible.

 Click on the “more” link below to proceed to the Google Motion Chart animations.

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