The twelve days of testing

On the first day of testing,
my students gave to me
an unfinished TRC.

On the second day of testing,
my students gave to me
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the third day of testing,
my students gave to me
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the fourth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the fifth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

 

 

 

On the sixth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the seventh day of testing,
my students gave to me
Seven long staff meetings,
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the eighth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Eight encore classes,
Seven long staff meetings,
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

 

 

 

On the ninth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Nine urgent emails,
Eight encore classes,
Seven long staff meetings,
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the tenth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Ten brand new students,
Nine urgent emails,
Eight encore classes,
Seven long staff meetings,
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

 

 

 

 

 

On the eleventh day of testing,
my students gave to me
Eleven shortened specials,
Ten brand new students,
Nine urgent emails,
Eight encore classes,
Seven long staff meetings,
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC.

On the twelfth day of testing,
my students gave to me
Twelve long sleepless nights,
Eleven shortened specials,
Ten brand new students,
Nine urgent emails,
Eight encore classes,
Seven long staff meetings,
Six PD workshops,
Five pacing guides,
Four erasers,
Three flash cards,
Two ScanTrons,
and an unfinished TRC!

Brace yourself for attacks

"Brace yourself. 1-365" by Flickr user chelo.face.

The time period for gathering signatures on our petitions will soon end. Once the Ohio Secretary of State certifies that we have collected more than 231,000 registered voters’ signatures, S.B. 5 will be placed on the ballot in the November General Election and be subjected to the citizens’ veto.

Teachers, firefighters and police officers are some of the highest-trusted professionals in the United States. Despite this fact, we will be the target of an expensive and ugly political propaganda war waged by our enemies specifically designed to discredit us.

Soon, we will encounter ads on television, radio, the Internet and in print that will portray us as a lazy and opportunistic privileged class, unwilling to share the economic pain of the private sector. Our enemies will say that they are simply trying to fix Ohio and save the middle class, but they can’t because we stand in their way.

What our enemies will say about us will make our blood boil. As these attacks begin, it is only natural to want to blindly strike back in response, to do something, anything, in defense of our profession. We must take care not to burn ourselves out before the real battle begins. We must be strategic, measured and stay on message during the fight for our lives.

Take heart in the fact that we have been entrusted with that which is most precious to all Ohioans–their children. In the coming months, do not become discouraged and do not despair. We are all in this together. We will emerge victorious. We are CEA.

Speak Out: Waiting for "Superman"

Phone Booth, February 2008 by Flickr user Maggie Osterberg.

The documentary film, Waiting for “Superman,” by producer Davis Guggenheim is scheduled to open in Columbus on Friday, Oct. 14. A film that evokes strong emotions, it tells the story of injustice in America’s education system. It says important things about the challenges of the public education system. However, the reductive messaging—“charters are good” and “teachers unions are bad”—oversimplifies complicated issues and threatens to thwart thoughtful discussions about improving public schools.

You will be tempted to get defensive about this film. But CEA welcomes and encourages filmgoers to join us in our mission of making great public schools for every student. Association members have always led the fight for great public schools, and we hope the movie inspires others to become engaged in a larger discussion about the shared responsibility for public education.

The CEA Blog wants to know:

What are your thoughts about  Waiting For “Superman”? Do you think this film will create a constructive or divisive dialogue about improving public education? Feel free to write a review if you have already seen the film!

Visitors to the CEA Blog do not need to be registered to leave a reply. Simply click on the “Comments” link directly below the post title. Type in a screen name of your choice, enter your email address and leave your comment. Please make sure your comment adheres to our posting guidelines. Once your comment has been moderated, it will be visible to all visitors to the CEA Blog.